Australian Fungi and Plants

Finding mycorrhizal fungi

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amanita.JPG
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Australian fungi and plants

Many Australian macrofungi form beneficial 'mycorrhizal' relationships with native trees such as Eucalypts and Wattles. Mycorrhiza is derived from the Classical Greek words for 'mushroom' and 'root'. 

 

The hyphae of the fungus, surround the root tip of the plant.

Through photosynthesis, a chlorophyll-containing plant makes simple carbohydrates (using carbon dioxide, water and sunlight) and in exchange, fungi pass nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus) from soil to plants, help provide water and can also protect plants against disease.

Australian mycorrhizal fungi species have co-evolved with native plants and are found in the vicinity of a number of native tree species.  For example, Eucalyptus spp. (Gum trees); Acacia spp. (Wattle trees); Pomaderris spp. (Native Dogwood); LeptospermumNothofagus cunninghamii (Myrtle).

Some common types of Australian mycorrhizal fungi include:

Gilled fungi - Amanita, Cortinarius, Inocybe, Laccaria, Lactarius, Russula, Tricholoma.

Bolete fungi (artificial grouping of pored macrofungi)

Coral fungi

Truffle-like fungi

Source:

Gates, G. & Ratkowsky, D. (2014). A Field Guide to Tasmanian Fungi, Tasmanian Field Naturalists.

amearnsii

amearnsii

eglobulus_large

eglobulus_large

etereticornis

etereticornis

adealbata1

adealbata1

ecordata3

ecordata3

enitens

enitens

eptychocarpa

eptychocarpa

ecrenulata

ecrenulata

eobliqua

eobliqua

cficifolia

cficifolia